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Articles Relating To Tomato Gardening – Part 3

Posted in tomato, tomato gardening on May 22nd, 2010 by admin – Be the first to comment

Here are some articles about Tomato Gardening.

  • Flower Meaning and Care » Interesting Tomato Growing Tips-If You … – It is only with buying the actual plants and not with the rest of the tomato gardening supplies you need. The fact of the matter is sometimes you do not end up with the plant you wanted, and most of the tomato growing tips you read …
  • Flower Meaning and Care » A Solid Tomato Watering Schedule Is One … – Tomato gardening tips about water are pretty simple and pretty universal. Tomatoes need about one gallon of water each and every day. Their root systems are vast and many are close to the top of the soil. Even though the soil may be …
  • Tomato Casual » Upside-down Tomato Gardening – By Tomato Queen. Are you a container-gardener hanging your tomato plants? Try growing them upside-down! This recent trend is thought to put less stress on the weight-bearing stems, which require no staking, providing better circulation …
  • Easy Urban Gardening: Tomatoes in a Bucket – The only thing that might stop the urban gardener from growing his own bountiful crop of tomatoes is sunlight. Tomatoes need quite a bit of light—all day would be preferably, but at least six hours a day is a minimum. …

Is the Tomato a Fruit or a Vegetable?

Posted in tomato, tomato gardening on May 18th, 2010 by admin – Be the first to comment

Tomato, a fruit or a vegetable.

What is the difference between a fruit and a vegetable?

I thought that I’d do a little research.  I knew it was a fruit, but growing up and harvesting them from a vegetable garden got me thinking.

What is the scientific explanation?  What is the truth?

“The confusion about ‘fruit’ and ‘vegetable’ arises because of the differences in usage between scientists and cooks. Scientifically speaking, a tomato is definitely a fruit. True fruits are developed from the ovary in the base of the flower, and contain the seeds of the plant (though cultivated forms may be seedless). Blueberries, raspberries, and oranges are true fruits, and so are many kinds of nut. Some plants have a soft part which supports the seeds and is also called a ‘fruit’, though it is not developed from the ovary: the strawberry is an example. As far as cooking is concerned, some things which are strictly fruits may be called ‘vegetables’ because they are used in savoury rather than sweet cooking. The tomato, though technically a fruit, is often used as a vegetable, and a bean pod is also technically a fruit. The term ‘vegetable’ is more generally used of other edible parts of plants, such as cabbage leaves, celery stalks, and potato tubers, which are not strictly the fruit of the plant from which they come. Occasionally the term ‘fruit’ may be used to refer to a part of a plant which is not a fruit, but which is used in sweet cooking: rhubarb, for example. So a tomato is the fruit of the tomato plant, but can be used as a vegetable in cooking.”

Source

So there you got  the answer to whether a Tomato is a Fruit or Vegetable.

Articles Relating To Tomato Gardening – Part 2

Posted in tomato, tomato gardening on May 6th, 2010 by admin – Be the first to comment

Here are some articles about Tomato Gardening.


  • Survey: On tomato gardening, what should one do to discourage … – I finally found the gross tomato worm that has been wrecking my tomato plants which I’ve been nurturing in one of those deck gardening contraptions. What is the.
  • Organic Tomato Gardening – With the help of organic tomato gardening, you’ll be able to say goodbye to those shop-bought tomatoes with tough skins, and tasteless, pale flesh. Whenever tomatoes are home grown organically and are naturally ripened, you can pluck a …
  • Organic Tomato Gardening – With the help of organic tomato gardening, you can say goodbye to those shop-bought tomatoes with tough skins, and tasteless, pale flesh. Whenever tomatoes are home grown organically and are naturally ripened, it is easy to pluck a …
  • Organic Tomato Gardening – With organic tomato gardening, you can say goodbye to those shop-bought tomatoes with tough skins, and tasteless, pale flesh. Whenever tomatoes are home grown without chemicals and therefore are naturally ripened, you can pluck a tomato …


Dreaded Tomato Wilt

Posted in tomato, tomato wilt on April 19th, 2010 by admin – Be the first to comment

How did I get Tomato Wilt?

What causes tomato wilt?

First cause of  tomato wilt is the lack of or excess water.  Make sure that you have good drainage.

Bacterial wilt can be diagnosed with a simple test. Remove the plant from the soil. Carefully rinse the roots and lower part of the stem. After rinsing is completed, cut out a section from the lowest part of the stem  just above the roots that is  four inches long.

Suspend the stem section in a jar of water and watch the bottom end for a cloudy, milky oozing substance.  This is the bacteria coming out of the infected plant.

  1. Fusarium Wilt
    Symptoms of fusarium wilt is the yellowing of the lower leaves.   It is a fungus.
  2. Root-Know
    A wormlike microorganism that feeds on the roots, causing galls, loss of feeder roots and induction of fungal root decay. Infected plants may be stunted and off-color.
  3. Southern Blight
    Rapidly wilting and death of the entire plant.  The fungus attacks the stem near the soil line and forms a white mold. Later in the season, mustardseed-like structures called sclerotia appear on the mold.
  4. Bacterial Wilt
    a.k.a.  as southern bacterial wilt, is a rapid collapse and death of the entire plant.
  5. Verticillium Wilt
    The verticillium wilt fungus, Verticillium albo-atrum, causes disease in the same manner as the fusarium wilt fungus. The margins of lower leaves are initially wilted, yellowed and necrotic, often in a V-shaped pattern
  6. Walnut Wilt
    Wilting of tomato plants may occur when they are planted near walnut or butternut trees.
  7. Spotted Wilt
    The tomato spotted wilt virus causes a disease sometimes referred to as spotted wilt. This disease occurs erratically but can sometimes cause devastating losses in some Tennessee tomato fields. Purple to bronze “freckles” and rings appear on leaves, stems and fruit. Leaves may be pale and plants stunted.
  8. Root Knot Nematodes

For complete description and cures for tomato wilt.

Articles Relating To Tomato Gardening – Part 1

Posted in tomato on April 16th, 2010 by admin – Be the first to comment

Here are some articles about Tomato Gardening.

  • Organic Tomato Gardening – With organic tomato gardening, you’ll be able to leave behind those shop-bought tomatoes with tough skins, and tasteless, pale flesh. Whenever tomatoes are home grown without chemicals and therefore are naturally ripened, …
  • Organic Tomato Gardening – Through organic tomato gardening, you can say goodbye to those shop-bought tomatoes with tough skins, and bland, pale flesh. When tomatoes are home grown organically and are naturally ripened, it is easy to pluck a tomato off your own …
  • Organic Tomato Gardening | Google The Elite – Visualize sinking your teeth into a freshly picked, wonderfully ripe, sweet and organically grown tomato, with all the juice running down your chin.
  • Organic Tomato Gardening – With the help of organic tomato gardening, you can leave behind those shop-bought tomatoes with tough skins, and bland, pale flesh. When tomatoes are home grown without chemicals and are naturally ripened, it is easy to pluck a tomato …

Tomato Gardening

Posted in tomato on April 12th, 2010 by admin – Be the first to comment

What’s to love about Tomato Gardening?

It all comes down to the five senses.

  1. Sight
  2. Sound
  3. Smell
  4. Touch
  5. Taste
But first what do I remember about Tomato Gardening.

I remember when I was growing up watching my grandfather eating tomatoes from his garden.

I remember my grandfather and grandmother planting, tending and harvesting tomatoes from the garden.

I remember him watering, fertilizing, digging up and removing the soil and having a truck load of new soil brought in.

I remember my grandmother sending us down to pick tomatoes and various other vegetables from the garden and having them brought to the kitchen before lunch and dinner.

My grandfather always loved to come in from the outside after working and eating a plate of sliced tomatoes  from the garden and sprinkled with sugar.

Tomato gardening has been something that I remember since I was a little kids.  It brings back wonderful childhood memories of working in the garden with my grandparents.

Sight

What does the tomato look like?  Color, Size and Shape of the tomato,  The vine, the leaves the soil.  Think about everything that you take in as you look at a tomato

Sound

The sound of the tomato as you pluck it from the vine,  Slice it with a knife.  The sound as you take a bite of the tomato

Smell

What smells do you associate with a tomato?  Starting in the Garden, tilling the soil, putting down the fertilizer, harvesting the tomato.

Cutting and cooking  the tomato and finally eating the tomato.

Touch

What do you feel when you pick up the tomato.  Is it firm, soft, mushy, bruised?  What do you feel when you are inspecting the tomato and/or the vine?

Taste

Finally, the tasted.  What does the tomato taste like.  Is sweet or sour?  Is it juicy or is it dry?   What do you taste?  What do you personally like when you taste a tomato?

This is what tomato gardening is to me.

Extra Reading For Tomato Gardening

Posted in tomato, tomato gardening on April 7th, 2010 by admin – Be the first to comment

Some Extra reading for Tomato Gardening


  • Organic Tomato Gardening – With organic tomato gardening, you’ll be able to leave behind those shop-bought tomatoes with tough skins, and tasteless, pale flesh. Whenever tomatoes are home grown without chemicals and therefore are naturally ripened, …
  • Organic Tomato Gardening – Through organic tomato gardening, you can say goodbye to those shop-bought tomatoes with tough skins, and bland, pale flesh. When tomatoes are home grown organically and are naturally ripened, it is easy to pluck a tomato off your own …
  • Organic Tomato Gardening | Google The Elite – Visualize sinking your teeth into a freshly picked, wonderfully ripe, sweet and organically grown tomato, with all the juice running down your chin.
  • Organic Tomato Gardening « Edmond’s Blog – With organic tomato gardening, you’ll be able to say goodbye to those shop-bought tomatoes with tough skins, and tasteless, pale flesh. When tomatoes are home grown organically and therefore are naturally ripened, you can pluck a tomato …


Baked tomato meatballs

Posted in tomato meatballs on April 5th, 2010 by admin – Be the first to comment
Baked tomato meatballs
  • 650 gr lean beef mince
  • 1/2 cup fresh breadcrumbs
  • 2 onion spring (shallot) , chopped
  • 2 tablespoon fresh oregano, chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, chopped
  • 1 x 700g tomato passata
  • 1/2 cup grated taste cheese

Method:

  1. Place mince beef, breadcrumbs,onion spring, oregano and garlic in a large bowl and season to taste. Mix well to combine. Roll mixture into 16 balls.
  2. Spray a non stick frying pan with cooking oil spray and heat on medium-high. Cook meatballs for 10 minutes, until browned and cooked through. Meanwhile, heat passata in a saucepan for 5 minutes, until warm. Transfer meatballs to a greased baking dish. Pour over passata and scatter with cheese.
  3. Place under a hot grill for 5 minutes, until cheese melts. Serve with mashed potatoes.

Source: Australian Table Magazine, April 2008

You’ll love Baked tomato meatballs.

Heirloom Tomato Seeds

Posted in heirloom tomato, heirloom tomato seeds, tomato on April 3rd, 2010 by admin – Be the first to comment

Looking for Heirloom Tomato Seeds?

The question you have to ask is what is an Heirloom Tomato?

  1. What is the talk all about?
  2. Is it a particular variety?
  3. Are they all that different than a regular tomato?
  4. What are the advantages to the heirloom tomato?
  5. Isn’t a tomato just a tomato?
What is all the talk about?

“An heirloom is generally considered to be a variety that has been passed down, through several generations of a family because of it’s valued characteristics. Since ‘heirloom’ varieties have become popular in the past few years there have been liberties taken with the use of this term for commercial purposes. “

Is it a particular variety?

  1. Commercial Heirlooms: Open-pollinated varieties introduced before 1940, or tomato varieties more than 50 years in circulation.
  2. Family Heirlooms: Seeds that have been passed down for several generations through a family.
  3. Created Heirlooms: Crossing two known parents (either two heirlooms or an heirloom and a hybrid) and dehybridizing the resulting seeds for how ever many years/generations it takes to eliminate the undesirable characteristics and stabilize the desired characteristics, perhaps as many as 8 years or more.
  4. Mystery Heirlooms: Varieties that are a product of natural cross-pollination of other heirloom varieties.
What is the origin of the  term “Heirloom Tomato”?

” ‘Heirloom’ applied to plants was apparently first used by Kent Whealy of Seed Savers Exchange, who first used “heirloom” in relation to plants in a speech he gave in Tucson in 1981. He had asked permission to use the term “heirloom” from John Withee, who had used the term on the cover of his bean catalog. John said sure, that he had taken it from Prof. William Hepler at the University of New Hampshire, who first used the term “heirloom” to describe some beans that friends had given him back in the 1940s. “

Are they all that different than a regular tomato seeds?

Yes,

There are many different varieties of heirloom tomatoes seeds,

“and probably one of the most popular reasons people to plant these tomatoes is their local resistance to pests, local weather, as well as their unique look and flavor. Also, heirloom tomato seeds are frequently grown organically without pesticides, fertilizers, or growth hormones.”

“Most people are accustomed to the look of a tomato in a grocery store; many of the heirloom varieties give a different taste, texture and look to the tomato. This gives them another reason for being a popular hobby farm tomato. People enjoy the distinctive flavors and look of some of the varieties such as Brandywine, Black Krim, Big Rainbow, which is a yellow tomato with interesting red swirls, and other primitive tomato seed varieties.”

What are the advantages to the heirloom tomato seeds?

“Many of the heirloom varieties of tomatoes are easy to grow organically. Since they are resistant to pests, you don’t need to use pesticides, and because they grow easily in local climates, you don’t need fertilizers either. This means that they can be organically grown in local soil; also, being organic is another popular reason for consumers to purchase the heirloom tomatoes.”

Source: what-is-heirloom-tomato

The Upside Down Tomato Garden Planter

Posted in tomato, upside down tomato garden on April 2nd, 2010 by admin – Be the first to comment

The upside down tomato garden.

OK, I screwed up and wrote another piece on this subject.  I’m going to post it anyway.

This is another version of the topsy turvy planter.  It seems a little sturdier or free standing, but it looks like cheap plastic.  It look like something that was made in the same factory as those cheap plastic outdoor childrens playground or those self standing basket ball nets.

I am not opposed to the upside down tomato garden method.  I just want it to be aesthetically pleasing.    Especially if you have limited space.  I don’t want to look out on my balcony and see some hideous plastic monster.

Below there are a bunch of benefit to upside down tomato garden planters

  1. Space: The upside down tomato planter suits  any plant that is a vine.  Vines on the ground take up a lot of space.  If your space is limited, you have a dilema.  Should you or should you not plant a Vine plant.  That is tomatoes,  beans, zuchini, etc.
  2. Better and easier care, cultivation and harvesting.
  3. Soil managment:  upside down planter containers use less fertilizer and compost.
  4. Weather.  since there is less soil to manage there is less problems when you have very wet and very dray seasons.
  5. Pests and Diseases Control.  Better risk management
Here are some things from the other side of the spectrum
  1. What is available is ugly.
  2. The are prone to blowing over in a storm.
  3. The species of tomato all the planter show are most likely too heavy for the planter
  4. There needs to be some way to maintain correct moisture levels in the soil.  So it does not dry out.
That’s my take on the upside down tomato garden.